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    Tuesday
    Oct162012

    The case for Devo Plus is now even more relevant

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/politics/blog/2012/oct/15/salmond-cameron-scottish-independence-referendum-live?intcmp=239#block-507c0a1d58f91d7bbadac5eb“As all the parties now agree, the time for discussing process is over and the issue now is to address substance. This makes the case for Devo Plus even more relevant.
     
    “Since our launch in February, Labour, Liberal Democrats and Conservatives have indicated their openness to further powers, so it now appears that the real question in 2014 will be a straight question between independence and a form of Devo Plus. 
     
    “For the result of the referendum to be decisive, those that do not support independence can now come together with Devo Plus for a long-term solution that provides a clear choice in the referendum and settles this for a generation.
     
    “This means making this clear ahead of the vote and obtaining a consensus that is capable of delivery after the referendum.”

    Wednesday
    Sep262012

    Devo Plus release second report, Improving Social Outcomes in Scotland

    The Devo Plus group has published its second report focusing on how we deliver improved social outcomes in Scotland. You can download the report here (PDF format) or by clicking the image of the report.

    Thursday
    Jun212012

    Poll shows clear support for Devo Plus

     

    A new poll, carried out by Ipsos MORI on behalf of Reform Scotland, has shown that Devo Plus is the most popular way forward for Scotland’s constitutional future, easily outpolling both the status quo and independence.

    The poll also showed that two-thirds would like to see the Unionist parties campaign for more powers for the Scottish Parliament as an alternative to independence.  Further, it showed that twice as many people believe most of the money spent by the Scottish Parliament should be raised by the Scottish Government rather than the Westminster Government – the core message of the Devolution Plus proposal.
     
    In response to the poll information Jeremy Purvis, Leader of the Devo Plus Group, commented:

    “This is the first substantive test of opinion in Scotland on the Devo Plus proposals and shows very clearly the desire of the Scottish people to improve on the status quo, but rejecting independence.  The very clear support for Devo Plus as the best way forward for Scotland should be listened to. The evidence is also clear that the vast majority of people would like the parties that do not support independence to work together to progress the case for Devo Plus. Devo Plus is not a tactic to defeat independence, rather it is a carefully considered way forward for a stronger Scotland within the UK  - this Ipsos Mori poll now shows it is the way forward most preferred by the people of Scotland also.  

     

    Ipsos MORI polled 1003 people between 7 and 14 June 2012. Full results/tables will be available on Ipsos MORI’s website.
     
    Thinking about Scotland’s constitutional future, which of the following statements most closely matches your views on this issue?
    Scotland should remain part of the UK with the same devolved powers it has at present 29 %
    Scotland should remain part of the UK with the increased powers outlined in the Devo Plus proposal 41 %
    Scotland should become a fully independent country, separate from the rest of the UK 27 %
    Some other view 4 %
     
    As you may know, most of the money spent by the Scottish Parliament currently comes from the Westminster Government. Who do you think should be responsible for raising most of the money the Scottish Parliament spends?
    The Scottish Government 61 %
    The Westminster Government 29 %
    Don’t know 10 %
     
    To what extent do you agree or disagree that those who want to stay in the UK should campaign for more powers for the Scottish Parliament within the UK as an alternative to independence?
    Strongly agree 29 %
    Tend to agree 37 %
    Neither agree nor disagree 13 %
    Tend to disagree 9 %
    Strongly disagree 8 %
    Don’t know 4 %
    Agree (Net) 66 %
    Disagree (Net) 17 %